What is OBD-II Code P246A – Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit Intermittent/Erratic Bank 2 Sensor 3



What is OBD-II Code P246A – Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit Intermittent/Erratic Bank 2 Sensor 3

If you own a modern car, it’s likely equipped with an On-Board Diagnostics II (OBD-II) system. This system is designed to monitor the performance of your vehicle and diagnose any issues that arise. When the OBD-II system detects a problem, it will generate a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) that can be read with a scanner, providing valuable information to help repair the issue. One such code is OBD-II Code P246A, which refers to an exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit intermittent/erratic for bank 2 sensor 3.

What is OBD-II Code P246A?

OBD-II Code P246A is a diagnostic trouble code that indicates there is an issue with the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit for bank 2 sensor 3. This sensor is responsible for measuring the temperature of the exhaust gas as it exits the engine, and relaying that information to the engine control module (ECM) to help it regulate fuel and air mixtures.

When the ECM receives an intermittent or erratic signal from the exhaust gas temperature sensor for bank 2 sensor 3, it will activate the Check Engine Light and generate OBD-II code P246A.

Common Causes of OBD-II Code P246A

1. Faulty Sensor

The most common cause of OBD-II code P246A is a faulty sensor. The sensor may be damaged, wiring could be frayed, corroded, or the sensor may have failed entirely. This causes the signal sent to the engine control module to be intermittent or erratic.

2. Wiring Issues

Wiring issues can also cause OBD-II code P246A to appear. Over time, wiring can become corroded, frayed or damaged, and may lead to a poor connection, causing the ECM to receive an intermittent or erratic signal from the sensor.

3. Failed ECM

Although less common than the other issues, a failed engine control module can also cause OBD-II code P246A. The ECM may not be able to accurately read the signal from the exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit, resulting in an intermittent or erratic signal to the ECM.

How to Repair OBD-II Code P246A

1. Sensor Replacement

The first step in repairing OBD-II code P246A is to replace the faulty sensor. This involves locating the sensor on your vehicle and removing it, then installing a new one. Depending on the make and model of your vehicle, this may be an easy or challenging task, and it’s best to consult your owner’s manual or a certified mechanic for guidance.

2. Wiring Repair

If a faulty sensor is ruled out, the next step is to inspect the wiring. This can involve replacing damaged or frayed wires and checking for loose connections. This task requires basic electrical knowledge or seeking a certified mechanic.

3. ECM Replacement

In rare cases, a failed engine control module may be the cause of OBD-II code P246A. Replacing the ECM is typically a more complicated task that should only be attempted by a qualified mechanic or dealer.

Common Questions About OBD-II Code P246A

1. How serious is OBD-II code P246A?

OBD-II code P246A is considered a moderate issue and should not be ignored. In some cases, the Check Engine Light will turn off on its own if the problem is resolved, but if left unchecked, this code could lead to further problems in your car, including decreased gas mileage and decreased power output.

2. Can I still drive my car with OBD-II code P246A?

If your vehicle is exhibiting no unusual driveability problems, it is safe to drive your car for a short period. However, it’s best to have the issue fixed as soon as possible to prevent further issues that could lead to more significant damage.

3. Can I clear OBD-II code P246A myself?

Many OBD-II scanners come equipped with a function for resetting DTC codes. However, we would recommend not clearing the code until the repair is completed.

4. What’s the cost of repairing OBD-II code P246A?

The cost of repairing OBD-II code P246A varies depending on the cause of the issue and the make and model of the vehicle. Generally, replacing the sensor is a relatively inexpensive repair that can be done for around $50-100, depending on your location and parts availability. However, if wiring or the ECM needs to be replaced, the cost can increase significantly.

5. How do I prevent OBD-II code P246A from occurring?

The best way to avoid OBD-II code P246A is proper maintenance, including regular oil changes and inspections. Properly functioning sensors, wiring, and engine components can significantly reduce the likelihood of your car presenting with OBD-II Code P246A errors.

Conclusion

OBD-II Code P246A is an indication that you may have an issue with your vehicle’s exhaust gas temperature sensor circuit for bank 2 sensor 3. If left unchecked, this issue can lead to bigger problems with your engine in the future. By understanding the causes of OBD-II code P246A and how to repair it, you can make an informed decision about how to proceed with maintaining your vehicle. As always, if you’re unsure about diagnosing or repairing this issue, you should consult a qualified mechanic or your dealer.

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